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A Comedy & A Tragedy: A Memoir of Learning How to Read and Write

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From Travis Hugh Culley and Ballantine Books

A_COMEDY__A_TRAGEDY_cover

As a student of writing and literature, my literacy is one of those things which I constantly utilize within my life, but it is also something that I often take entirely for granted.  I began reading before I entered public school, and wound up being placed in a pre-1st classroom after essentially “testing out” of kindergarten.  So, as large a role as literacy has played in my life, it’s never been something that I was even all that conscious about.  It’s been a part of my life for as long as I can remember.

The idea of an established writer being someone who did not come to literacy until age seventeen lays the groundwork for an incredibly impressive and inspirational tale.”

A_COMEDY__A_TRAGEDY_coverThis was a huge factor for why the opportunity to review A Comedy & A Tragedy was so appealing to me.  Written by Travis Hugh Culley and published by Ballantine Books, A Comedy & A Tragedy: A Memoir of Learning How to Read and Write details Culley’s struggle toward literacy among a seemingly-endless field of obstacles.  Emerging from a history of abuse and a toxic family environment, Travis begins to find inventive ways to hide his illiteracy while navigating life as the epitome of the nontraditional learner.  His experiences in theater become a fitting gateway to learning to read and write, but the journey is an arduous one.

It was difficult to hide my fear of reading from my acting teachers.  They were training us to take a piece of writing and translate every word of it into action.  They saw behind the process.  In every way, the theater was a threshold for learning literacy because it depended on a full and exact understanding of the actions.” (Culley 139)

The idea of an established writer being someone who did not come to literacy until age seventeen lays the groundwork for an incredibly impressive and inspirational tale.  Culley’s ideas about what writing means to him are so unique and intelligent, it almost seems as if his “late blooming” ended up being a tremendous advantage in his future as a writer.  He seems hyper-aware of the meaning of words, and the spectrum of that meaning; no doubt thanks to his theatrical experience and the idea that the same set of lines in a play can be performed in endless ways with endless nuance of meaning.

The script we’d rehearsed so many times seemed to completely disappear between the actors.  This incredible instructive illusion, this force of coordination, was magical because at the end of the night it led me back to myself” (Culley 181)

Even though my path to literacy was quite different, the traumatic circumstances that Culley encountered were things I found myself relating to on a very deep level.  I’ll admit, this is not exactly a lighthearted read.  There are moments which are difficult to get through, but they are also incredibly compelling, because they highlight the immense achievement of Culley’s eventual mastery of written language.

Travis_Culley_credit_Megan_HicklingI would recommend this book to anyone, though perhaps especially to writers and aspiring creatives.  But this is a unique experience for people, because as you read Culley’s words, you become more aware of your own process of reading, of why it is important to you, and the power that words have over our lives and our interactions with others.  And, when it comes to writing, Culley beautifully expresses that which every writer from amateur to professional holds dear: that writing has the power to teach you more deeply about yourself and your environment, and it will force you to examine and heal your deepest wounds in the process.

TRAVIS HUGH CULLEY is the author of The Immortal Class: Bike Messengers and the Cult of Human Power. Travis has an MFA in writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and was a recipient of the Ox-Box Fellowship in Saugatuck, Michigan.

A Comedy & A Tragedy: A Memoir of Learning How to Read and Write (ISBN: 9780345506160) is available now through retailers including Amazon in Hardcover ($26.00) and Kindle ($12.99) formats.

This post contains an affiliate link. You can read more about our official disclosure policy here. A review copy of A Comedy & A Tragedy: A Memoir of Learning How to Read and Write was provided to The Mommy Gamers by Random House.

About Ashley Montgomery


Single mother of two. Loves all kinds of gaming. Former co-host on a few retired podcasts related to video games and film. Twitter goddess. Most likely a mythical creature.