subscribe: Posts | Comments

Holiday Gift Idea: Arctify.com T-shirt Subscription

0 comments

arctifys

Subscription boxes seem all the rage right now, but for me, it’s hard gifting one in part because of the pricing models – having to pay for three months at a time for a Loot Crate is a bit too hard on my budget! But I discovered Arctify.com earlier this year at Chicago’s C2E2 convention, and despite myself, I rather love my new collection of T-shirts.

What does Arctify.com offer?

Arctify is a pretty simple operation, as far as subscriptions go. Every month, $8.99 is automatically taken out of your bank account, and then you receive a new t-shirt based on a trending Marvel property. For the time being, Arctify appeals to a narrow segment of geeks – Marvel fans who are comfortable wearing adult unisex t-shirt sizes. It’s fun, though, to get your shirt in the mail, without all the extra clutter.

The good…

When I first encountered Arctify, the one factor that sold me on the subscription was actually the quality of the shirts. They’re super-soft and comfortable. At C2E2 the company offered a cool gray Captain America shield shirt that is still one of my favorites. Since then, I’ve received many – although I don’t know where all of them are right now. My favorites have been a shirt with Iron Man on one side and Captain America on the other, which I wore to see “Captain America: Civil War” at the drive-in earlier this year, and my Black Panther t-shirt, which I wore to my Environmental Stewardship classes this fall because it, uh, had an animal head on it.

arctifybpAnother plus for me is the fact that it’s just one t-shirt. I love subscription boxes as much as the next person, but to be honest, a lot of the stuff I get just ends up taking up space in my house. T-shirts I’ll use. T-shirts I’ll wear. Funko Pop! figures and plush? Well, I’ll probably exclaim in delight, put them on a shelf, forget about them until I don’t remember why I liked the character in the first place, then give them away. (Except for “The A-Team” ones. If someone were to get those for me I’d keep ’em.)

And finally, it’s the price that really made me go for it. $9 is very reasonable, so that I barely notice when that amount is taken out of my finances. It’s a relatively cheap way of showing my Marvel allegiance whenever a new movie/character is trending.

The bad…

I happen to be kind of girly, so I do long for more of a variety of t-shirt designs and sizes. And the inky comic book-inspired designs aren’t my favorite because they look pulp-fictionish to me. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it’s simply not my style. My favorite shirts are the ones that have simplified logos and are and textured, and there aren’t many of those so far.

Also, as a woman who has idolized Marvel women since the ’70s, I really wish I Arctify would be more diverse in their representations. I have enough trouble locating merch that features any female superheroes other than Supergirl and Wonder Woman. And while I’m a fan of both those DC ladies, I need more variety in my superhero diet. I get that I got a Deadpool shirt when that movie came out, and all the t-shirts have been very timely and synchronized with big media debuts. But still.

The Final Word

Overall, an Arctify subscription is a good value and a fun package to get every month. In a way I like how focused the timing and the designs are, though I’d love more size selection at the very least, so I can transfer the subscription to my kid if I want. If you are looking for a relatively easy and inexpensive way to gift a Marvel fan a subscription, this would be it. Note: I have not tried to unsubscribe from Arctify.com, so I can’t speak to how that works. And now, if you’re ready to get your next t-shirt from Arctify.com, go here.

About Helen A. Lee


Helen is a veteran writer with credits in The Learned Fangirl, Electronic Gaming Monthly, Gamespot.com, Chicago Tribune and nytimes.com, among others (if pressed, she may cop to writing instructional guides to pop star hair and interviewing "Desperate Housewives" stars). She's a huge geek and her son, age 11, looks to be following in her footsteps.