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    Review: We Binged Realm Royale for the First Time

    Realm Royale Last Chicken Review The Mommy Gamers

    During “New Game Tuesday” on The Mommy Gamers, we played Realm Royale for the first time and it was awesome. It is free on Steam right now and is currently in alpha mode. While we did experience some minor glitches, the overall feel of it was smoother than most at this phase.

    Hi-Rez, the makers of Realm Royale, have also made games like Smite. As a mom, Realm Royale feels more kid-friendly, and I say that loosely. If the game chat is off, because cuss words and foul language from other players, it is okay for them to play. Unless you’re still on the fence about guns and such, I do see it being friendlier versus PUBG or Fortnite.

    Realm Royale Jump Zepplin Screen Review The Mommy Gamers

    Since this was my first time playing, I got World of Warcraft and Overwatch vibes immediately playing the game. In retrospect, it has the same concept of PUBG or Fortnite but has the all the differences in graphics, mechanics, and gameplay.

    Graphics are very cartoonistic and let me tell you about that chicken. When you have minimal health, you move into a blue chicken carrying the putrid white flag and looks like it is having a hard day without any caffeine. Not to mention, it won’t stop clucking, so opponents will track you down. It’s better to run and hide the best you can.

    One area is called Fungal Forest and gives me Zangarmarsh feels from World of Warcraft with the overgrown mushrooms. Then there is an area that is nothing but swamp marshlands, and it immediately signaled a Zandalari feel, again from World of Warcraft. The overall graphics remind players of WoW or Overwatch, but I see both elements within the game.

    Realm Royale 3 The Mommy Gamers Screen Shot

    Using the basic keys, A, S, D, W, you move around. Sadly, you do need to use a mouse to move around as the letter keys move your body, not the screen. A few tips, Z mounts a horse; Control crouches. Use I for inventory and tab for the map. Yes, so different. Falling to the ground seems scary and different. It does take an adjustment period, but when you hit the ground, you land in the superhero pose and there is no fall damage.

    There are no materials to collect, no llama, no building to save yourself from teams or duos either. Queue all the tears. Realm Royale does share the same color scheme as well as Fortnite; so grey, green, purple and gold. I didn’t see any blue in the several hours that I played. If there is an item you don’t need, you can disenchant them for shards. You can then take those shards to a forge and create one of six items, and queue multiple, non-similar items. Example, I can create a piece of gear and a health or armor potion. The gear piece will take a full minute, while the flask will take a mere 20-30 seconds.

    Realm Royale 4 Fungal Forest The Mommy Gamers

    Overall, the gameplay does take a minute to get used to; and by a minute, I mean a few games. I will say that while I am skeptical about any game that comes out the mocks Fortnite, I am hesitant to pick up and try. I am glad I did and will probably be picking this one up again. Since the game is still in alpha mode, the battle royale aspect has not even hit the servers yet, amongst other things that are non-clickable. I see the massive potential behind this and am optimistic that this game will be popular for some time.

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    Awkward – Xbox One Review

    Awkward Game Xbox One Mike Robles The Mommy Gamers

    If there’s one thing everyone loves, it’s party games. Almost every party we throw ends with people loading up their phones and sitting around playing some form of awesome party game. So what happens when Snap Finger Click take that formula and makes things… Awkward? Well, things get… Awkward.

    From the dev team that brought you It’s Quiz Time comes a new kind of trivia game. Instead of downloading an app or using your phone players take turns answering questions via passing a controller. One person will answer a question then another player will have to guess how they responded. Questions start out simple at first, something easy going like “Do you like Cats or Dogs better?”. This sets players up with a false sense of security and exceeds it incredibly well. Players will think to themselves “Well this isn’t so bad, I don’t get what’s so awkward about this.” As they continue to play the questions get slightly more personal and intrusive. Next thing you know everyone is squirming and afraid to answer any questions and there is laughter and heated discussions and well… it’s perfect.

    Awkward is presented in an old timey fashion and plays well, but it’s not without its flaws. Personally I wasn’t a fan of passing the controller back and forth because I’m lazy and when I’m cuddled up on my couch the last thing I want to do is move. There also isn’t any real “host” of the game so there is A LOT of silence and background music. I would have liked to had a quirky host reading off the questions and having some snarky answers.

    For you streamers, Awkward has built in interactivity where you can play with up to 500,000 viewers. That’s a lot of viewers. Don’t have any friends? No problem, Awkward also lets you play solo. That’s right, Awkward will let you play with yourself.

    If Jackbox games are the fun conversations you have during a night out with friends, Awkward is the “TMI” that that one friend shares after having a bit too much to drink. Everyone wants to know more, but then they’re afraid they asked and everyone has a good laugh about it the next day.

    The author was compensated with a copy of Awkward for review purposes.

     

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    City of Brass – Xbox One Review

    City of Brass Release Date The Mommy Gamers Mike Robles

    You may not have heard of Uppercut Games before, but you have definitely played their games. This independent game studio is comprised of devs that have worked on games like Bioshock, Bioshock 2 and XCOM. Now this team of devs are taking gamers on adventure straight out the pages of Arabian Nights with their new game: City of Brass.

    Taking on the role of a thief, players will swing their sword, use their whip, and use traps all while to trying to find treasure in the mysterious and cursed location known as the City of Brass. For such a large city players will find themselves feeling closed off and in tight quarter in this first person perspective game. The occasional open area arrives to break from the enemies and tight alleyways presented in the game.

    City of Brass The Mommy Gamers

    Swing a sword, crack a whip, die. Repeat… A LOT. City of Brass can be pretty hard at times. Enemies spawn and are vicious and aggressive, levels seem semi-randomized but also very similar. City of Brass is a grind from start to finish. There are only 12 levels so it’s not incredibly long, but players will have a hard time getting to the end. Those that manage to finish the game and defeat that brutal final boss will have a sense of accomplishment. Those that do not, will be forced to live in the City of Brass forever hacking and slashing and whipping.

    City of Brass The Mommy Gamers Screenshot Mike Robles Release Date

    One of the great features of City of Brass is it’s streamer interactivity. Players who stream to Mixer can use the PC version or Xbox version and connect to Mixer for some fun (depending on your definition) surprises from your audience. Twitch users can connect the PC version and have the same… benefits(?) bestowed upon them by their chat. It’s this kind of thing that makes City of Brass worth playing because streamers and their audiences can complete the game and have a sense of togetherness. It’s a beautiful thing.

    City of Brass will offer gamers plenty of challenge while keeping them on their toes. I don’t think there’s a ton of replay value in the game unless you’re a streamer or completionist; but it is great for a quickie one Arabian Night stand.

    *The reviewer was compensated for this review with a copy of City of Brass.

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    I, Hope – Xbox One Review

    Let’s this out of the way first:

    You should totally go out and buy I, Hope. 100% of the proceeds go to GameChanger Charity, a charity devoted to helping kids battle cancer. Here’s what GameChanger Charity stands for:

    We Leverage technology  & innovation to ease the pain and suffering of children facing life-threatening illnesses.

    The have visited over 40 hospitals and helped changed over 14,000 lives by donating more than 2.7 million gifts. With the price point only being $9.99 that’s an easy $10 donation to charity! Everyone wins.

    I, Hope stars Hope, a young girl who needs to battle a monster called Cancer that has landed on her island and is corrupting it. Along the way she visits different parts of her island to get the tools she needs to battle Cancer. Strength, Wisdom, Courage and Hope are just some of the tools you will gather to help overcome cancer.

    I Hope Game Screenshot 2

    I, Hope, in theory, sounds like it could be an amazing game. It’s got an important message and the fact that 100% of the proceeds go to help kids battle cancer make it a worthy purchase. However everything else about the game sullies the otherwise noble cause that I, Hope champions.

    The controls are frustrating and all over the place. Most of the time Hope would miss jumps, or land incorrectly. Camera angles only to the frustration as many times Hope would get caught in parts of the environment and I would have to exit the game and start over. Having to replay puzzles over and over again because easy jumps were missed was infuriating.

    I Hope Screenshot 2

    I, Hope is also incredibly short. It can be completed in just around two hours. While that’s fun for people with not a lot of time on their hands, the bad control scheme and shoddy camera angles aren’t worth it. It really pains me to say that because there is such a great cause behind the game. Bad controls, lousy camera angles and bland gameplay just tarnish so much of what could have made I, Hope great.

    I, Hope suffers from poor execution of an otherwise valiant idea. Should you buy it? Yes. Because you can net some easy Xbox Gamerscore and feel ok knowing that proceeds go to charity. At the same time, you can also just donate to charity and get the same sense of satisfaction knowing you did something great, without having to slog through a bad game.

    The reviewer was given a copy of I, Hope for review purposes.

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    Influenster Cherish Voxbox Unboxing ~ The Mommy Gamers

    Influenster sent me their Cherish VoxBox, a new box with full sized products and coupons for awesome stuff. I opened it up live because unboxings are fun and people seem to like watching them. I infrequently get these boxes of goodies in exchange for my honest review. This particular box had items in it for the whole family. The dog, the kids, myself, and my imaginary boyfriend.



    If you’re interested in Influenster you can check them out at: www.influenster.com

    Comments make us happy! If you’re still reading this, please leave us one. I’ll comment back!

    *I received all of these products from Influenster for free in exchange for my honest review. The Mommy Gamers are not employees of Influenster, we just love getting awesome things for free and sharing our thoughts about them with you!

    The Council: Episode 1- The Mad Ones – Review- Xbox One

    I’m all for a good mystery. A well presented narrative game where “decisions matter” is exactly my cup of tea. The Council presents a “Whodunnit” in the form of trying to find your missing mother. Environments are beautiful but that is where the game stops impressing. The voice work isn’t great and the story is all over the place. After completing the first chapter I forgot all about trying to find my mother and instead was semi-curious about everyone else’s reason for being in the same place at the same time.

    The Council does have some good things going for it. When the game starts you can select a class for protagonist, Louis. Each class will give you a skill tree that can be used when engaging in conversations later on the game. This will help Louis keep up with the search for his mother while finding out other interesting facts about the guests staying in the mansion. The conversations are a key part of the game mechanics as everything weighs on whether or not you get the information you need. Unlike other “narrative games”when you fail a conversation in The Council the game keeps going. Other guests will build negative feelings towards you and you’ll need a higher skillset next time you challenge someone in conversation.

    The problems with The Council come from all the characters in the game. The voice acting isn’t great and the main character doesn’t have any emotion in his acting. Accents are all over the place and after talking to everyone in the mansion I stopped caring about Louis’s mother and cared more about the overarching plotline that was sprinkled throughout.

    The controls feel like they were more suited for a mouse and keyboard rather than a controller. Every time I walked into a new area and the camera angle changed I had to readjust my fingers on the controller otherwise Louis would end up in walking off in some other direction. Trying to navigate around this massive mansion became more of a chore than fun exploration.

    The Council isn’t a BAD game, but it’s not a great game. To be honest between the bad voice acting, not great controls, and weak story there’s a lot more bad than good. I am not even sure if I will pick up the rest of the series to continue. I might, just because I am still curious enough to try and figure out what happened. Or I’ll just wait until all the chapters are out and watch a Let’s Play on YouTube or something.

    The reviewer was given a copy of The Council: Episode One on Xbox One for review purposes. 

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    Death Road to Canada – Xbox One Review

    There’s a zombie apocalypse.

    You have a car with very little gas.

    Every city is different.

    Everyone you meet is different.

    All you want to do is get to Canada.

    Described as a “Permadeath Randomized Road Trip Simulator”, Death Road to Canada is that and so much more.

    Death Road to Canada Review The Mommy Gamers Mike Robles

    With retro-inspired graphics, Death Road to Canada not only succeeds on creating a great retro look, but also excels at creating a great retro sound. Upbeat and jazzy at times, the soundtrack provides a great background as you make your way from Florida to Canada. Not only does Death Road to Canada draw inspiration from retro games, it also borrows some aesthetics from old horror movies. There are filters such as “grain” and “glitch” which make the game look like an old grindhouse film. If you want to see a zombie massacre in all it’s hi-def glory those filters can be turned off.

    Death Road to Canada Police Headquarters Info Screenshot The Mommy Gamers

    Death Road to Canada sees players driving from Florida to Canada while encountering strangers, deserted towns, and zombies. Lots and lots of zombies. As you make your way to the great white north you need food, water, gas, medical supplies and more to keep you and your party healthy and happy. There is also an RPG element as you encounter other survivors sometimes you have to make a decision as to whether or not you can accommodate them.

    One of the more unique aspects in Death Road to Canada is  the character creator. You can start the game as a random character, or you can create your own unique version of yourself, or loved ones. While yes, a character creator is nothing new, what makes it unique in Death Road to Canada is how the character creator is implemented into the game. There are several modes available from the start, with more available upon first completion of the game. One of those modes will actually have everyone you’ve created show up as other party members in game. So if you ever wanted to see how well you and your friends would do in the event of a zombie apocalypse, this is your chance.

    Death Road to Canada Fight Scene

    Since the levels are randomized the replayability of Death Road to Canada is incredibly high. I’ve played it about 20 times and each time was a completely different adventure. Yes, I died each time without ever making it to Canada, but I had fun dammit! At one point each of my humans died and I was playing as a dog. The dog drove a car. Let me repeat that statement: THE DOG DROVE A CAR.

    Death Road to Canada Screenshot dog

    Death Road to Canada is difficult enough to give any player a challenge, but not so difficult that you’ll rage quit. Each time you play there’s some new tactic that you’ll want to try. You’ll always run into someone new who has some awesome new powers. You will (almost) always die. Death Road to Canada is a bloody good road trip that you won’t want to end… even if you have to pee. Because rest stop bathrooms are gross, and they have zombies… you should just hold it until you get to a mall or something.

    Death Road to Canada is available for purchase on Humble Bundle here and also on Steam. The Mommy Gamers are Humble Bundle affiliates. Using our link helps support The Mommy Gamers and Extra Life Charity.

    The reviewer was given a copy of Death Road to Canada for review purposes

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    The Adventure Pals – Xbox One Review

    The Adventure Pals is a “cartoon-inspired” platforming game.

    It. Is. AWESOME.

    I don’t even know where to begin with this game. I’ll start with the looks. Cartoony, bright, and adorable, The Adventure Pals borrows a lot of it’s aesthetic from games like Castle Crashers and old cartoons like Dexter’s Laboratory. Every human, creature, and hot dog in this game are just bursting with personality. The levels all have the same general look to them, a lot of dirt carefully placed to have the players jump all over with some sort of lush background representative of the world you are in. This, to me, was one of my very few complaints about the game. Each world has levels, and each level doesn’t feel, visually, that different from the one before it. The worlds themselves are great looking, you have everything from a tranquil forest to a post-apocalyptic wasteland.

    Mr. B has been going around kidnapping old people and turning them into hot dogs. Why? As he puts it:

    “Because… REASONS.”

    That’s just some of the crazy humor you’ll find in The Adventure Pals. The game is filled with wonderful characters who have some great dialogue. Along with your trusty pet Giraffe, you will be going from world to world attempting to rescue the old people from becoming hot dogs all while trying to get your grandpa back. One of the best things about this game is the giraffe. As players jump across multiple platforming levels, the giraffe can use his tongue as a helicopter blade to slow your descent. It’s totally silly looking, but awesome.

    The controls in this game are amazing. Which is a MUST for platforming games. The levels are just hard enough that if you make a mistake, you can easily see where it was and correct your movement. It’s nice to see a game provide a nice challenge without needing to resort to Boshy levels of difficulty. These levels are cleverly designed and players will need great timing and precise button presses to get past the later levels.

    In addition to great platforming, there are also RPG elements in the game. Players level up and can select permanent boosts. Coins are collected and spent at shops to fill a backpack with bombs, health potions and more. There’s a basic attack that players can execute but there isn’t really an option to learn new skills. It would have been nice to have the players be able to learn and upgrade melee attacks, but not having that doesn’t take anything away from the game.

    The Adventure Pals also has the option for drop-in/drop-out co-op. So you can get your own adventure pal, cuddle up on the couch and start getting through the game together. I can’t say enough good things about The Adventure Pals. Clearly the team at Massive Monster and Armor Games put in a ton of work creating this title. It’s fun, adorable, great looking, and runs so incredibly smooth on both my Xbox One, and my Xbox One X. If you’re looking for a new platforming game, look no further than The Adventure Pals.

    The Adventure Pals is out now on PC, PS4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch.

    The reviewer was given a code for review purposes.

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