The Mommy Gamers

Browsing Tag:

simulator

    Frostpunk: What will you do to survive?

    The only way I’m getting snow here in Florida
    Frostpunk wallpaper with city overview and weather balloon

    It’s been almost two years since Frostpunk first released. So, naturally, I’m just now getting around to playing and writing about it. Over the years I’ve watched a fair bit of gameplay on Twitch and knew it was something I would enjoy. I finally gave it a go after getting a chance to try it out on the PS4 release. And now it’s got brand-new DLC called The Last Autumn.

    What Is It?

    Frostpunk is a resource management simulation game where you have to build a city and survive the elements. It’s made by 11 bit studios who make other fantastic games I love like This War of Mine, Moonlighter, and Children of Morta. And it’s available on PC, PS4, and Xbox – so pick your platform and get to playin.

    With the base game, you build your city around a coal-powered generator. Research, set laws, build, and explore your way to survival… or perhaps doom. All while balancing hope and discontent of the people.

    In order to do anything in the game, there is a cost. Buildings take wood, steel, and maybe some research or workers. Laws cause discontent or hope and make an impact on how your people go about their lives. They also unlock special buildings. Research takes time but unlocks upgrades, building types, and other necessary skills to keep your city from dying. Exploration also takes time but gives you people or supplies, or both.

    Balance is key in Frostpunk. You have to keep a good eye on all your production for the times when blizzards come and you need the generator to work triple time or stockpile so you can upgrade and expand when bringing in groups of refugees. Maybe you’ll be really good at it and there will be no discontent… probably not though, people seem to hate soup round here.

    Okay, I beat that. Now what?

    DLC you say?! Other scenarios?! Yup, we got those. There are several scenarios you unlock by surviving 20+ days. And if you beat those, there’s an endless mode with different difficulties. Not enough? How ’bout customizing the difficulty of all of these modes? STILL not enough? Well fine then.

    In late January, a new prequel expansion where you work to build the generator that is used to survive after the freezing cold arrives. This expansion is practically a whole other game in the same story, built on the same mechanics but capable of being its own stand-alone title.

    And if you beat this and still want more then you’ll be happy to hear there is another expansion coming sometime this year called Project ‘TVADGYCGJR’.

    What did you think, Divine?

    If you’ve read my other articles, you know I’m a fan of 11 bit studios game This War of Mine. I think the studio does a great job telling stories and building games with solid mechanics. Frostpunk is no exception. I subconsciously put off playing this game cause I knew I’d get sucked in quickly, and I had CompTIA exams to get done ha!

    So far I’ve played about 72 hours between the PC and PS4. I enjoy the ability to change difficulty levels and the different scenarios available. I haven’t gotten a chance to play Last Autumn yet cause money doesn’t grow on trees, but I’ve watched enough to know it’s just as awesome as the rest of the game.

    This style of game is right up my alley and like I said, it’s been executed beautifully, so of course, I’m going to give it a glowing review. 10/10. If this style of game is not your usual jam, you might still enjoy it for the story and if you bump down the difficulty you’ll probably enjoy it more. Just like the snow and ice, the game is pretty unforgiving if you don’t pay attention.

    How much is this addiction going to cost me?

    If you’re smart, you’ll catch it on sale either on steam or through sites like Fanatical. Full price it’ll take $30 for the base game. You can then get a season pass for $35 (usually on sale) which gives you Frostpunk Rifts, The Last Autumn, Project TVADGYCGJR, a digital artbook, and soundtrack. Or you can bundle it all together currently for $50.

    There’s no accounting for the time you’ll sink into it though, that’s priceless.

    DISCLAIMER: I received a review copy of the PS4 release but purchased the PC version after falling in love with the game. This is my honest review of an awesome product. Thank you!

    Discussion
    Share on

    Death Road to Canada – Xbox One Review

    There’s a zombie apocalypse.

    You have a car with very little gas.

    Every city is different.

    Everyone you meet is different.

    All you want to do is get to Canada.

    Described as a “Permadeath Randomized Road Trip Simulator”, Death Road to Canada is that and so much more.

    Death Road to Canada Review The Mommy Gamers Mike Robles

    With retro-inspired graphics, Death Road to Canada not only succeeds on creating a great retro look, but also excels at creating a great retro sound. Upbeat and jazzy at times, the soundtrack provides a great background as you make your way from Florida to Canada. Not only does Death Road to Canada draw inspiration from retro games, it also borrows some aesthetics from old horror movies. There are filters such as “grain” and “glitch” which make the game look like an old grindhouse film. If you want to see a zombie massacre in all it’s hi-def glory those filters can be turned off.

    Death Road to Canada Police Headquarters Info Screenshot The Mommy Gamers

    Death Road to Canada sees players driving from Florida to Canada while encountering strangers, deserted towns, and zombies. Lots and lots of zombies. As you make your way to the great white north you need food, water, gas, medical supplies and more to keep you and your party healthy and happy. There is also an RPG element as you encounter other survivors sometimes you have to make a decision as to whether or not you can accommodate them.

    One of the more unique aspects in Death Road to Canada is  the character creator. You can start the game as a random character, or you can create your own unique version of yourself, or loved ones. While yes, a character creator is nothing new, what makes it unique in Death Road to Canada is how the character creator is implemented into the game. There are several modes available from the start, with more available upon first completion of the game. One of those modes will actually have everyone you’ve created show up as other party members in game. So if you ever wanted to see how well you and your friends would do in the event of a zombie apocalypse, this is your chance.

    Death Road to Canada Fight Scene

    Since the levels are randomized the replayability of Death Road to Canada is incredibly high. I’ve played it about 20 times and each time was a completely different adventure. Yes, I died each time without ever making it to Canada, but I had fun dammit! At one point each of my humans died and I was playing as a dog. The dog drove a car. Let me repeat that statement: THE DOG DROVE A CAR.

    Death Road to Canada Screenshot dog

    Death Road to Canada is difficult enough to give any player a challenge, but not so difficult that you’ll rage quit. Each time you play there’s some new tactic that you’ll want to try. You’ll always run into someone new who has some awesome new powers. You will (almost) always die. Death Road to Canada is a bloody good road trip that you won’t want to end… even if you have to pee. Because rest stop bathrooms are gross, and they have zombies… you should just hold it until you get to a mall or something.

    Death Road to Canada is available for purchase on Humble Bundle here and also on Steam. The Mommy Gamers are Humble Bundle affiliates. Using our link helps support The Mommy Gamers and Extra Life Charity.

    The reviewer was given a copy of Death Road to Canada for review purposes

    Category
    Featured, Games, Reviews
    Author
    Share on
Live now! Click to join the party!
CURRENTLY OFFLINE