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    You’re not special

    You're Not Special Game Review The Mommy Gamers

    We are living in a golden age of indie games. Whether it is Stardew Valley, Her Story, Papers, Please or Firewatch, these are games from small production companies that have something to say. They show that it isn’t unlimited resources that make a good game but an interesting premise and good execution. That is not to say that every indie game to hit the market is a masterpiece, or even worth your time. But we now live in a world where we can buy fun, inspiring or interesting games for a reasonable price. And the list just keeps on growing.

    You’re not special by Reky Studios fits itself nicely into that mold. You play a character who is not the center of the story. You are just some guy who happens to be in wrong place at the wrong time, or the right place at the right time, and finds himself unable to do much about it. I can’t see Ubisoft making a game like that.

    Its what you do with it that counts

    The game itself is reasonably short and can be “completed” from anywhere between 5 minutes and 3 hours, with multiple endings to entice players into replying the game several times. It is primarily a puzzle game but also has action scenes that your character plays a minor role in. But it is not the puzzles that will keep you coming back for more, as good as they are. Once you’ve solved them, its just a matter of replication. It is the story that Reky has developed that keeps you intrigued enough to want find out how each ending evolves.

    And how do they do that? With writing that is informative enough to give you a glimpse of what might be to come and keep you wanting to know more. The use of hearing old wives tales in front of a fireplace and the general feeling that you are jumping into someone else’s story half way through is an intriguing device and one they have developed nicely.

    The other NPCs of the story have their own background, which can lead to side quests, and can often be very funny, with even some 4th wall breaking humor thrown into the mix. But they are used fleetingly, and are generally there to assist you in making or spending your money and progressing the story.

    Throughout all of this there are constant reminders that this is not your adventure. You have no significant power. It takes you longer than the hero to make your way through the various mazes. You do not fight the bad guy, at least not directly. And there are items at the village market that you will never buy. Sure, you can scrounge enough silver together to buy a cloak, but it would take you a very long time to buy armor or a sword. And there is no need; you are not the hero. You are not special.

    But my mom says I’m special

    But the game is. Its fun, its interesting, and its challenging. Sometimes infuriatingly so. And sometimes I feel there should be something to point you in the right direction. Playing through, I missed that there was an extra passageway for me to use to meet the next boss and spent 30 minutes wondering why I couldn’t go any further. It took a question to the developer on their discord to know what to do. That won’t be available forever and not everyone will choose to ask.

    There are also secret exits to the map, for example, that are needed to progress some of the story. That would have infuriated me if I had not been lucky enough to find it by chance. But there are also secrets I did not solve and storylines I did not complete that do make me curious to come back for more.

    Ultimately, it is the fact that this game meets each of my tenants for a good indie game that makes me recommend it for your wishlist. It is fun, the fact that it was even made (and by a single game developer I might add) is inspiring and the entire concept is interesting. All this and at reasonable price. This is why indie games can be great. Welcome to the golden age.

    You’re not special was developed by Reky Studios and is currently available for download for Windows on Steam.

    *The Mommy Gamers received a copy of the game for review purposes.

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    We Happy Few Review

    We Happy Few Review The Mommy Gamers

    What if a pill existed that could make you endlessly happy with the unfortunate side effect that it would slowly erode your memory and make you not care about what was really going on in the world? Compulsion Games, We Happy Few is an action-adventure game that explores a world filled with that very drug and all the complications and secrets it seeks to hide.

    We Happy Few is set in a fictional English city called Wellington Wells around the 1960s. Residents of the town begin taking a drug called Joy, a hallucogenic, to forget a rather upsetting choice that was made following an alternate timeline version of World War II. While Joy makes them happy and helps them forget past tragedies, it also makes them easily manipulated and controlled. The story is told through three distinct characters who all chose to avoid Joy for their personal reasons and are each trying to accomplish a personal goal and get themselves out of Wellington Wells before the entire city implodes on itself.

    Players tackle the world of We Happy Few from a first person perspective and the game combines elements of survival, stealth, and melee combat. Other residents of Wellington Wells are not keen on anyone not taking their Joy dubbing those people “Downers”. Residents and police will be immediately hostile towards anyone not fitting in and thus you’ll need to sneak, fight, and craft your way through the city to accomplish the various goals.

    The combination of stealth, survival, and crafting is both satisfying and problematic. On one hand successfully fooling citizens into thinking you are happily on your joy and accomplishing a goal without alerting the entire city is fantastic. On the other hand when a confrontation does break out the melee combat is swimmy and frustrating to control.

    It feels as if that combat may have been better served by a third person perspective instead of the first person one. Weapons do have durability and will break on forcing you to either hunt down a new weapon or craft one. Luckily crafting components are everywhere and I never wanted for anything especially in the later part of the game.

    My overall compulsion to loot every item actually caused me a lot of suffering because I was constantly overburdened but that is more an issue with my playstyle than the game itself. I do wish there was a perk that completely eliminated the carry weight of the characters.

    In the early parts of the game moving through areas without triggering a bunch of combat can be difficult as residents don’t take kindly to running, jumping, or being on the streets past curfew. Skills the player can choose do eliminate some of these concerns. The game gives out skills point after every completed quest or objective and one can pretty quickly eliminate any need to fit in on the streets pushing the stealth aspects to only be necessary in areas where you are considered trespassing.

    As a player who is very impatient, reducing the stealth aspects was a boon for me and I took those skills early on. Most of the time the crafting, stealth, and melee aspects of the game came together for me nicely and it was pretty satisfying to actually play.

    My biggest overall complaint with We Happy Few is the world feels unfinished. The game was originally released in early access in 2016. It showed with an extremely promising trailer before early access went live that painted it more akin to a story driven dystopia experience ala Bioshock. When the game did hit early access it was more akin to a run based survival game with a procedurally generated world and quests.

    Over the two years before the game came out of early access Compulsion worked to push the game in the opposite direction and built in a more substantial story and character development. The main areas of the game and all the quests were crafted instead of procedurally generated. This shift makes the survival aspects feel like they no longer matter, negating the players need to actually track hunger and thirst.

    At the same time the world doesn’t quite feel as fleshed out as I would like. I wanted more concrete details on the back story. Most of that information is sectioned away into masks that the player must find to hear little clips from each character’s past. If you don’t really work to seek those out you always feel like you are missing their individual motivations which makes their actions feel empty and meaningless.

    Complications aside We Happy Few is an interesting take on a dystopian adventure. The fact that the game left me wanting more information, more backstory, more of the characters is a testament to the fact that Compulsion has set up a world and a concept that is interesting enough to hold my attention even if navigating that world is not always the most satisfying experience.

    *The Mommy Gamers were given a copy of We Happy Few free for review purposes. 

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    The Mommy Gamers Podcast Episode 184: Plugging Ourselves

    The Mommy Gamers Podcast Episode 184 Plugging Ourselves

    In Episode 184 of The Mommy Gamers Podcast Carrie and Marcia chat about back to school, new video games, and their summer TV & Movie favorites. We also put a call out to our community asking parents what their guilty pleasures are once the kids all go back to school. You all had great answers. We read them all out and gave you all a little shout out at the end of the show!

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    Come at Me Summer Steam Sale!

    How to Love Your Library and Your Wallet
    Steam Summer Sale 2018

    Okay, I will confess, I have always been a gamer and mainly on Xbox consoles over the years. I’ve also picked up a Wii and a Nintendo 3DS within that time. When the PlayStation 4 launched, I picked it up on a dare and love it. But behold! I was introduced to PC by several friends and have been told over the years, that PC is the way to go. Boy, did I doubt them? I never had the most amazing rig, but it ran a few games, World of Warcraft being numero uno in Casa de Haddock. I picked up Guild Wars and played that for some time, moved over to another MMO that I can’t think of since it was a 10-minute hit.

    But if we fast forward and save you all from the tragic story of a beloved school and work laptop crashing, I needed a PC. I set myself up with an HP Omen 870-244 rig and purchased the dual monitors via Amazon. Okay, sorry, but I still spared you a long story and the other logistics.

    House Flipper The DivisionNow to the focus of this piece. The Summer Steam Sale.  PC gaming has been in my life a mere 6-months if that! Low and behold, the Summer Steam Sale is here, and I have already made some impressive scores.

    The Witcher: Enhanced Edition Director’s Cut and Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings Enhanced Edition for a combined total of $4.87. That’s less than five dollars!

    Before the sale, I picked up Borderlands and Borderlands 2 elsewhere for a little easier on the wallet but picked up all the DLC content that I missed for a measly couple dollars. Tomb Raider was a favorite upon the launch of the PlayStation 4 and would love to have a chance to play this on PC with graphics as high as this thing will allow. Oh yeah, I paid $3.25 for that.

    Summer Steam Sale 2018 Under Ten Dollars
    Life is Strange is in there since I would like to try another episodic series. I also grabbed the Bioshock trilogy for a few bucks. Granted I tossed the email with the receipt; it had to of been no more than ten dollars.

    Now that I’ve addressed the goodies I have already grabbed in the sale, how about what I hope to grab in the coming weeks, because of video games.

    Witcher 3 and the DLC content with it is half price, bringing it to $20. Then there is Dragon Age: Origins for its gorgeous deal of $4.99. Shall I mention all the LEGO games that made a list? Shall I also mention that Elder Scrolls, upon the writing of this article, has also gone on sale for 30-50% off? Since Tomb Raider was on my must play list, it is also on the sale list for 70-89% off their original prices.

    I will also mention that the Steam Link, which connects Steam to television is cost effective at this moment and is $2.50 last I heard.

    There are so many other great games out there that I am sure we need to pick up and add to our Steam collection. So tell us, what are you eyeballing, or what have you picked up from the Summer Steam Sale? Remember, this sale only goes through until July 5, 2018!

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